Doug Ford COVID-19 state of emergency

Ontario reports more than 2,100 new COVID-19 cases, record number of vaccines administered

Ontario reported more than 2,100 new COVID-19 cases on Friday — a drop from the 2,380 cases yesterday, although that case count was higher by approximately 280 cases due to a data catch-up process related to the provincial CCM system, according to the Ministry of Health.

However, today’s numbers are still a major jump from the 1,571 cases reported on Wednesday, 1,547 cases reported on Tuesday, 1,699 cases reported on Monday, and 1,791 cases reported on Sunday. Daily case counts have not crossed the 2,000 mark since January.

Out of Friday’s new cases, 682 were reported in Toronto, 397 in Peel, 254 in York Region, and 129 in Ottawa. The province is also reporting 12 more deaths today.

Approximately 1,838,592 doses of the COVID-19 vaccine have been administered across the province to date. Friday marked a record number of vaccines administered at 82,996, with 306,373 people fully vaccinated in the province to date.

Meanwhile — in the midst of increasing cases — the province is expected to release the latest COVID 19 modelling data  for Ontarians to get a better grasp of where we might be heading in the epidemic. But Ontario’s Science Advisory Table has already weighed in on the issue, noting that vaccinations in long-term care has paid off, but progress has otherwise stalled. Declines in community cases and test positivity have levelled off, and cases are increasing in most Public Health Units as we see mobility rise.

 

 

Key findings from their COVID-19 projections update presented March 11 include:

  • Variants of concern continue to spread across Ontario. Our ability to control the rate of spread will determine whether we return to normal or face a third wave of infection (continued masking and distancing are essential to controlling variants of concern).
  • Our behaviour over the next few weeks is critical in determining the quality of our summer.
  • High volumes of postponed care and missed screening and preventative care mean that there will be a substantial and prolonged surge in need for care across sectors.
  • Controlling cases, increasing vaccinations where they will have the greatest impact, and accelerating vaccinations overall are how we beat the pandemic.

Click here for more COVID-19 Ontario news.

Article exclusive to TRNTO